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Music selection for this page: "I Got You, Babe".


Losing any loved one, no matter the species or circumstances is, generally, an extremely emotional and painful experience (there are some exceptions, however).  We are never "ready" no matter how much we try to prepare for it and we each, individually, must find our own method(s) of trying to cope with the aftermath of such losses; there is no single "right way".

There are LOTS of folks who make their "living" via providing services/products that are claimed to allegedly ease the grief of those left "behind".  One of today's "buzz words" seems to be "closure", meaning dealing with whatever is a problem and/or difficult in order to "move on" and/or to move forward with ones life, despite the grief brought about by the loss.

For many folks, having funeral services for their "Dearly Departed" is a standard way of beginning the transition process of accepting the loss in order to be able to move forward with their life.  For many pet owners, having their beloved pets ashes in an urn or other suitable container brings a certain amount of comfort, something "tangible" to still have and keep nearby.

Death, dying, funerals, cremations, urns, headstones, placques, services, burials, etc. are not things the majority of us give a lot of thought to on a daily basis; it's certainly not something that's considered very 'mentally healthy' to dwell on.  ALL of the above named activities and/or products/items cost money and "somebody" is going to charge you for same.

I suppose I am fortunate, in that after having spent nearly $2,000 trying to save my dog ROMI's life, it's not something I am "allowed" to deal with.  "Pardon me" if I do not sound grateful!

You may view ROMI's "funeral service" at: http://www.thesqueakywheel.com/complaints///complaint5611.cfm

and in lieu of flowers, cards, casseroles or donations made to a favorite charity, your "click" to the Squeaky Wheel [which is free] will be much appreciated.

Dead dog held HOSTAGE to cover up TRUE cause of death.
On 4/13/04 my dog was inappropriately prescribed/dispensed Pfizer's drug RIMADYL by DVM Williams/Burien Vet Clinic, who claimed the drug was 'totally safe' for her. She had a massive adverse reaction to RIMADYL and I took her to DVM Hammond/Five Corners Emergency Clinic on 4/24/04 in an attempt to save her life, where she was put to sleep 12 hours later. I requested and paid $1100.00 for a necropsy [dog autopsy] to determine the cause of her death, which Five Corners arranged for with PHOENIX CENTRAL LAB/DVM MURNANE. DVM Hammond had claimed to me that she 'died of old age/natural causes', and DVM MURNANE/PHOENIX CENTRAL LAB refused to discuss the necropsy results with me despite DVM Hammond allegedly calling them later to authorize same. I sent a demand letter to MURNANE/PHOENIX LAB stating I wanted her "bits and pieces/frozen carcass" preserved and then released so that I could arrange for a 2nd necropsy and DNA IDENTIFICATION of her remains. I was told by some person named Linda Jewett that I needed to have a court order. MURNANE/PHOENIX LAB/Jewett has REFUSED to confirm the status of her "remains", no doubt to cover up on behalf of the "guilty parties" to ROMI's horrific death and MURNANE/PHOENIX CENTRAL LABORATORY continues to hold my dead dog's "bits and pieces/frozen carcass" HOSTAGE although I do not owe anyone any money.

UPDATE: THANKS to "The SQUEAKY WHEEL", I have now been offered to either pick up ROMI's frozen body ONLY or cremation which, of course, would ELIMINATE any possibility of a 2nd necropsy and DNA Identification.

Phoenix Central Laboratory has just been sent an e-mail message letting them know that you have seen this page.

Thanks very much for your support.
Ginger Sanchez

 


This page has been viewed 1438 times [11/27/04 8:24 PST]

I really appreciate all the support of the "clickers" and I am very grateful to the Squeaky Wheel for allowing me to have a funeral for ROMI at the extremely reasonable cost of only $5.00, services will continue until 10/29/05.

Each time someone visits this page, a copy of the "complaint" is sent to Phoenix Central Laboratory anonymously.  I also want to thank those folks who took the time and effort to e-mail directly to the Phoenix Central "professional" Lab staff at http://www.pclv.net/  to let them know what they think of this situation.

What I didn't know, and had no reason to know, was that there are NO laws/regulations and/or controls regarding "doggy remains" other than those invented by the individual companies who charge for these services.

First they killed you; then they cut you up into pieces; now they're hiding all the bits and pieces - ROMI, you and I answer to a "higher power", just as they will have to.


The Last Will & Testament

of An Extremely Loved Dog


I, Silverdene Emblem O'Neill (familiarly known to my family, friends &
acquaintances as Blemie), because the burden of my years and infirmities is heavy upon me, and I realize the end of my life is near, do hereby bury my last will and testament in the mind of my Master.

 
He will not know it is there until after I am dead. Then, remembering me in his loneliness, he will suddenly  know of this testament, and I ask him to inscribe it as a memorial to me.

I have little in the way of material things to leave. Dogs are wiser than men. They do not set great store upon things. They do spend their days hoarding property. They do not ruin their sleep worrying about how to keep the objects they have, and to obtain objects they have not. There is nothing of value I have to bequeath except my love and my loyalty.
These I leave to all those who have loved me, especially to my Master and Mistress, who I know will mourn me the most.

I ask my Master and my Mistress to remember me always, but not to grieve for me too long.  In my life, I have tried to be a comfort to them in time of sorrow, and a reason for added joy in their happiness.

It is painful for me to think that even in death I should cause them pain. Let them remember that while no dog has ever had a happier life (and this I  owe to their love and care for me), now that I have grown blind and deaf and lame, and even my sense of smell fails me so that a rabbit could be right under my nose and I might not know, my pride has sunk to a sick,bewildered humiliation.

I feel life is taunting me with having overlingered my welcome. It is time I said  good-bye, before I become too sick a burden on myself and on those who love me. It will be a sorrow to leave them, but not a sorrow to  die. Dogs do not fear death as men do. We accept it as part of life, not as something alien and terrible which destroys life. What may come after death, who knows?

I would like to believe that there is a Paradise. Where one is always young and  full-bladdered. Where all the day one dillies and dallies. Where each blissful hour is mealtime. Where in the long evenings there are a million fireplaces with logs forever burning, and one curls  oneself up and blinks into the flames and nods and dreams, remembering the old brave days on earth and the love of one's  Master and Mistress.

I am afraid that this is too much for even such a dog as I am to expect.

But peace, at least, is certain. Peace and a long rest for my weary old heart and head and limbs, and eternal sleep in the earth I have loved so well.  Perhaps, after all, this is best. One last request, I earnestly make. I have heard my Mistress say, "When Blemie dies we must never have another dog. I love him so much I could never love another  one". Now I would ask her, for love of me, to have another. It would be a poor tribute to my memory never to have a dog  again. What I would like to feel is that, having once had me in the family, she
cannot live without a dog!

I have never had a narrow, jealous spirit. I have always held that most dogs are  good. My successor can hardly be as well loved or as well mannered  or as distinguished and handsome as I was in my prime. My Master and Mistress must not ask the impossible. But he will do his best, I am sure, and even his inevitable defects will help by comparison to keep my memory green.

To him I bequeath my collar and leash and my overcoat and raincoat. He can never wear them with the distinction I did, all eyes fixed on me in admiration; but again, I am sure he will do his utmost not to appear a mere gauche, provincial dog. I hereby wish him the happiness I know will be his in my old home.
 
One last word of farewell, dear Master and Mistress. Whenever you visit my grave, say to yourselves with regret but also with happiness in your hearts at the remembrance of my long, happy life with you:

"Here lies one who loved us and whom we loved". No matter how deep my sleep I shall hear you and not all the power of death can keep my spirit from wagging a  grateful tail. I will always love you as only a dog can."
 
The original version of this tribute was written by Eugene O'Neill for his wife  Carlotta, a few days before their Dalmatian passed away from old age in December, 1940.


Just this side of heaven is a place called Rainbow Bridge. When an animal dies that has been especially close to someone here, that pet goes to Rainbow Bridge. There are meadows and hills for all of our special friends so they can run and play together. There is plenty of food, water and sunshine, and our friends are warm and comfortable.

All the animals who had been ill and old are restored to health and vigor. Those who were hurt or maimed are made whole and strong again, just as we remember them in our dreams of days and times gone by. The animals are happy and content, except for one small thing; they each miss someone very special to them, who had to be left behind.

They all run and play together, but the day comes when one suddenly stops and looks into the distance. His bright eyes are intent. His eager body quivers. Suddenly he begins to run from the group, flying over the green grass, his legs carrying him faster and faster.

You have been spotted, and when you and your special friend finally meet, you cling together in joyous reunion, never to be parted again. The happy kisses rain upon your face; your hands again caress the beloved head, and you look once more into the trusting eyes of your pet, so long gone from your life but never absent from your heart.

Then you cross Rainbow Bridge together.... 

Author unknown...


IF YOU CAN  

Start your day without caffeine,

Get going without pep pills,
Always be cheerful, ignoring aches and Pains,

Resist complaining and boring people with your troubles,

Eat the same food day after day and be grateful for it,

Understand when your loved ones are too busy to give you any time,

You can overlook it when those you love take it out on you when, through no fault of your own, something goes wrong,

Take criticism and blame without resentment,

Ignore a friend's limited education and never correct him,

Resist treating a rich friend better than a poor friend,

Face the world without lies and deceit,

Conquer tension without medical help,

Relax without liquor,

Sleep without the aid of drugs,

Say honestly that deep in your heart that you have no prejudice against creed, color, religion or politics,

Then, my friend, you are almost as good as your dog.


As the following news articles below show, the problem is apparently not limited to the remains of pets.

 from:  http://aolsvc.news.aol.com/news/article.adp?id=20041118162009990002

Updated: 04:20 PM EST 11/18/04 16:17 EST
 
Victims' relatives to make voices heard as crematory case nears end
By HARRY R. WEBER, AP

ATLANTA (AP) - Some victims' relatives plan to come to the courtroom, while others will send letters to make their voices heard as former crematory operator Ray Brent Marsh prepares to plead guilty Friday to dumping 334 bodies and passing off cement dust as their ashes.

Marsh will enter pleas to 787 counts against him, including theft, abuse of a corpse, burial service fraud and making false statements.

He is expected to receive a sentence that requires him to serve no more than 12 years in prison. Marsh, who is free on bail, will receive credit for the roughly seven months he spent in jail while awaiting trial. The sentence will be followed by a lengthy probation that would effectively last the rest of the 31-year-old's life.

A sentencing hearing will be held Jan. 31.

State guidelines would make Marsh eligible for parole in as few as 41 months, but that does not mean he will be released then, said Heather Hedrick, a spokeswoman for the state parole board.

"It's safe to say that for a crime of this nature it would be unlikely the board would release him at his first eligibility," Hedrick said.

It is not clear if Judge James Bodiford will approve the plea deal Friday or wait until sentencing, which could last several days depending on how many victims' relatives want to address the court.

So far, several dozen relatives have said they want to speak at the sentencing hearing, but the number has been increasing daily, according to the prosecutor's office. Other relatives, like Carol Bechtel of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, plan to send letters to be entered into the court record.

"The thing I wanted was accountability," Bechtel said. "If he does plead guilty, I'm OK with the Marsh family."

Marsh also will be given a chance to speak at Friday's hearing, though it is unclear what, if anything, he will say. One of his lawyers has said Marsh is not expected to make a statement beyond entering his pleas. Marsh may issue an apology at some point.

When Marsh's pleas are entered, his lawyers are expected to drop an appeal before the state Supreme Court dealing with their argument that the theft charges should be dismissed. The lawyers had argued that the corpses did not constitute property under the law.

Marsh also is charged in Tennessee with six felony counts of abuse of a corpse. He is accused of taking bodies to the crematory, then returning to Bradley County funeral homes with what were purported to be those cremated human remains. In some cases, the urns contained cement dust.

Tennessee prosecutor Shari Young says Marsh is expected to plead guilty to the Bradley County charges by the end of the year. As part of his agreement in Georgia, the two prison sentences will run concurrently.

Marsh allegedly stopped performing cremations at the Tri-State Crematory in Noble, Ga., in 1997, when he took over the family business that served funeral homes in Georgia, Tennessee and Alabama.

After an anonymous tip in February 2002, investigators found bodies scattered on the crematory property - in the woods, in buildings and crammed into burial vaults and behind Marsh's house.

Last month, a federal judge approved an $80 million settlement of a lawsuit by victims' relatives against Marsh. It's unclear how much of that money will be paid. In March, several dozen funeral homes that sent corpses to the crematory settled a class-action lawsuit against them for roughly $36 million. Much of that money has been paid.


from: http://aolsvc.news.aol.com/news/article.adp?id=20041119135109990019

Updated: 01:51 PM EST - 11/19/2004 12:21
 
Crematory operator to plead guilty

Relatives of loved ones whose bodies were found discarded at a crematorium gathered outside a courthouse Friday as the crematory operator prepared to enter a guilty plea.

Officials set aside half the space in the courtroom for relatives during the hearing set for Friday afternoon for Ray Brent Marsh.

Marsh is to enter pleas to 787 counts of theft, abuse of a corpse and other charges involving the dumping of 334 bodies that were supposed to be cremated.

Some of the relatives who arrived Friday morning displayed photos to passers-by.

Marsh was to be given a chance to speak at the Friday's hearing, though one of his lawyers has said he is not expected to make a statement beyond entering his pleas.

Sentencing is set for Jan. 31. It is not clear if Judge James Bodiford will approve the plea deal Friday or wait until the sentencing hearing, which could last several days if many relatives address the court.

Marsh is expected to receive a sentence of no more than 12 years in prison, plus probation that will effective last the rest of the 31-year-old's life. Marsh could be eligible for parole after 31/2 years but is unlikely to be granted release at his first opportunity.

Marsh allegedly stopped performing cremations at the Tri-State Crematory in Noble, Ga., in 1997, when he took over the family business. Based on an anonymous tip in 2002, authorities found more than 300 corpses on the property -- scattered in the woods, in buildings and crammed into burial vaults and behind Marsh's house.

Relatives have settled an $80 million lawsuit against Marsh, though it is unclear how much will be paid. A lawsuit against funeral homes that sent bodies to Marsh's crematory was settled for $36 million, and much of that has been paid.

Marsh later is expected to plead guilty to corpse abuse in Tennessee, where some funeral homes that sent bodies to his crematory were located. That prison sentence would be served at the same time as the one he receives in Georgia.

Several dozen relatives have already told the prosecutor's office they are interested in speaking at the January hearing, and others plan to send letters to be entered in court.

Carol Bechtel of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, plans to send a letter. "The thing I wanted was accountability," said Bechtel, whose parents were supposed to be cremated by Marsh. "If he does plead guilty, I'm OK with the Marsh family."


from: http://aolsvc.news.aol.com/news/article.adp?id=20041119152109990012

Updated: 03:21 PM EST - 11/19/2004 12:21
 
Crematory operator pleads guilty

A former crematory operator pleaded guilty Friday to dumping 334 bodies and giving the families of the deceased cement dust instead of ashes.

Ray Brent Marsh entered the pleas to 787 counts against him, including theft, abuse of a corpse, burial service fraud and making false statements.

"To those of you who may have come here today looking for answers, I cannot give (them to) you," Marsh told the family members in the courtroom. "To those of you I have hurt, I apologize."

A sentencing hearing was set for January 31. In exchange for the guilty pleas, he is expected to receive a sentence that requires him to serve no more than 12 years in prison followed by probation.

Superior Court Judge James Bodiford said he will wait to officially accept the plea deal until after the sentencing hearing, which could take several days.

"I will keep an open mind," Bodiford said.

Marsh, 31, allegedly stopped performing cremations at the Tri-State Crematory in Noble, Georgia, in 1997, when he took over the family business. After an anonymous tip in 2002, authorities found more than 300 corpses on the property -- scattered in the woods, in buildings, behind Marsh's house and crammed into burial vaults.

Authorities had set aside half the courtroom Friday for victims' relatives. Teri Crawford, whose brother was supposed to have been cremated at Tri-State in 2001 after he died of cancer, said Marsh's apology disappointed her.

"It was halfhearted and it was more to his family than to the rest of us," she said. "He has a sentence of 12 years. I will be tormented for the rest of my life wondering what happened to my brother."

Relatives have settled an $80 million lawsuit against Marsh, though it is unclear how much will be paid. A lawsuit against funeral homes that sent bodies to Marsh's crematory was settled for $36 million, and much of that has been paid.

Several dozen relatives have already told the prosecutor's office they are interested in speaking at the January sentencing hearing, and others plan to send letters to be entered in court.

Carol Bechtel of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, plans to send a letter. "The thing I wanted was accountability," said Bechtel, whose parents were supposed to be cremated by Marsh. "If he does plead guilty, I'm OK with the Marsh family."

Marsh also is expected to plead guilty to corpse abuse in Tennessee, where some funeral homes that sent bodies to his crematory were located. That prison sentence would be served at the same time as the one he receives in Georgia.


from: http://aolsvc.news.aol.com/news/article.adp?id=20041119121909990003

Updated: 12:19 PM EST - 11/19/04 12:15 EST
 
Georgia crematory operator to plead guilty, may apologize later; relatives gather outside court
By HARRY R. WEBER, AP
Updated: 12:19 PM EST

LaFAYETTE, Ga. (AP) - Relatives of loved ones whose bodies were found discarded at a crematorium gathered outside a courthouse Friday as the crematory operator prepared to enter a guilty plea.

Officials set aside half the space in the courtroom for relatives during the hearing set for Friday afternoon for Ray Brent Marsh.

Marsh is to enter pleas to 787 counts of theft, abuse of a corpse and other charges involving the dumping of 334 bodies that were supposed to be cremated.

Some of the relatives who arrived Friday morning displayed photos to passers-by.

Marsh was to be given a chance to speak at the Friday's hearing, though one of his lawyers has said he is not expected to make a statement beyond entering his pleas.

Sentencing is set for Jan. 31. It is not clear if Judge James Bodiford will approve the plea deal Friday or wait until the sentencing hearing, which could last several days if many relatives address the court.

Marsh is expected to receive a sentence of no more than 12 years in prison, plus probation that will effective last the rest of the 31-year-old's life. Marsh could be eligible for parole after 3 1/2 years but is unlikely to be granted release at his first opportunity.

Marsh allegedly stopped performing cremations at the Tri-State Crematory in Noble, Ga., in 1997, when he took over the family business. Based on an anonymous tip in 2002, authorities found more than 300 corpses on the property - scattered in the woods, in buildings and crammed into burial vaults and behind Marsh's house.

Relatives have settled an $80 million lawsuit against Marsh, though it is unclear how much will be paid. A lawsuit against funeral homes that sent bodies to Marsh's crematory was settled for $36 million, and much of that has been paid.

Marsh later is expected to plead guilty to corpse abuse in Tennessee, where some funeral homes that sent bodies to his crematory were located. That prison sentence would be served at the same time as the one he receives in Georgia.

Several dozen relatives have already told the prosecutor's office they are interested in speaking at the January hearing, and others plan to send letters to be entered in court.

Carol Bechtel of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, plans to send a letter. "The thing I wanted was accountability," said Bechtel, whose parents were supposed to be cremated by Marsh. "If he does plead guilty, I'm OK with the Marsh family."


from: http://aolsvc.news.aol.com/news/article.adp?id=20041120051409990001

Updated: 05:14 AM EST - 11/20/04 05:13 EST
 
Georgia Crematory Operator Pleads Guilty

LaFAYETTE, Ga. (AP) - A former crematory operator apologized to a packed courtroom after pleading guilty to dumping more than 330 corpses and giving relatives cement dust instead of the ashes of their loved ones.

But Ray Brent Marsh still didn't explain to grieving relatives why he let bodies pile up on his property - behind his house, in the woods, in buildings and crammed into burial vaults.

"The answers that many of you have come here today to hear I cannot give you," Marsh told family members who filled half the courtroom for a hearing Friday. "To those individuals who were genuinely harmed emotionally as a result of my actions, I apologize."

Marsh, 31, pleaded guilty to 787 counts, including theft, abuse of a corpse, burial service fraud and making false statements. Under a deal with prosecutors, he could get up to 12 years in prison.

A sentencing hearing was set for Jan. 31 and could take several days. Several dozen relatives have already told the prosecutor's office they want to speak at the hearing, and others plan to send letters.

"He has a sentence of 12 years," said Teri Crawford, whose brother was supposed to have been cremated in 2001 after dying of cancer. "I will be tormented for the rest of my life wondering what happened to my brother."

Security at Friday's hearing was tight as police officers in plainclothes surrounded Marsh, who has received numerous death threats since he was charged. Afterward, they escorted him through a throng of victims' relatives to a car.

Relatives have reached an $80 million settlement with Marsh, though it is unclear how much of that will ever be paid. A lawsuit against funeral homes that sent bodies to Marsh's crematory was settled for $36 million, and much of that has been paid.

Marsh also is expected to plead guilty to corpse abuse in Tennessee, where some funeral homes that sent bodies to his crematory were located. That prison sentence would be served at the same time as the one he receives in Georgia.

Marsh allegedly stopped performing cremations at the Tri-State Crematory in Noble in 1997, when he took over the family business. Authorities discovered the ghastly scene on his property after receiving an anonymous tip.

After the hearing, defense attorney McCracken Poston said he could offer little insight into Marsh's motives. "Some things are perhaps beyond explanation," he said.

That did not satisfy Rusty Cash, 33, whose mother-in-law Norma Jean Hutton was supposed to have been cremated.

"He don't have a clue what he put my wife through," Cash said. "All we want to know is why."


Some information to give you an idea of how big the "death industry" is:

from:  http://aolsvc.news.aol.com/business/article.adp?id=20041122153609990027

Updated: 03:36 PM EST - 11/22/2004 15:25 ET
Stewart Enterprises Refinances Senior Secured Credit Facility
By HARRY R. WEBER, AP

JEFFERSON, La.--(BUSINESS WIRE)----Stewart Enterprises, Inc. (Nasdaq NMS: STEI) announced today that it has refinanced its existing credit facility with a new senior secured credit facility consisting of a five-year $125.0 million Revolving Credit Facility and a seven-year $100.0 million Term Loan B. The Company's total debt outstanding after closing is $413.8 million, which includes $300.0 million in 10.75% senior subordinated notes, $100.0 million in Term Loan B, $10.0 million drawn on the Revolving Credit Facility, and $3.8 million in other debt. The Company has $58.3 million under the Revolving Credit Facility available for future draws after giving consideration to the $10.0 million drawn, $15.6 million of outstanding letters of credit, and the Company's reserve for its $41.1 million Florida bond.

As a result of the refinancing, the leverage-based grid pricing for the interest rate on the Company's Revolving Credit Facility was reduced to LIBOR plus 150.0 basis points at closing, representing a 50 basis-point reduction, and the interest rate on the Company's Term Loan B was reduced to LIBOR plus 175.0 basis points, which is 75 basis points below the prior agreement. The new agreement has substantially the same collateral and guarantees as the prior agreement and is subject to similar but somewhat less restrictive financial and other covenants.

The Term Loan B matures on November 19, 2011 with 94 percent of the principal due in 2011, and the Revolving Credit Facility matures on November 19, 2009, although the facilities will terminate six months prior to the maturity date of the Company's 10.75% senior subordinated notes due July 1, 2008 unless at least 75 percent of the principal amount of those notes are refinanced prior to that time.

During the first quarter of fiscal year 2005, the Company expects to incur a charge for early extinguishment of debt of $3.5 million ($2.2 million after tax or $.02 per share) to write-off the remaining unamortized book value of fees on the prior agreement. The fees incurred for the new agreement are approximately $1.5 million and will be amortized over the life of the new debt.

Additional information regarding the refinancing is contained in the Company's Form 8-K dated November 22, 2004, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Founded in 1910, Stewart Enterprises is the third largest provider of products and services in the death care industry in the United States, currently owning and operating 241 funeral homes and 147 cemeteries. Through its subsidiaries, the Company provides a complete range of funeral merchandise and services, along with cemetery property, merchandise and services, both at the time of need and on a preneed basis.

Stewart Enterprises, Inc., Jefferson Kenneth C. Budde, 504-729-1400


 


May my beloved partner ROMI rest in peace  - no matter wherever her bits and pieces/frozen carcass may be held hostage.

                         

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